Cybernetics News
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  About |  Newsletter |  Submit News |  Links |  Subscribe to CyberneticsNews.com RSS Feed Subscribe


More Articles
Enhanced instrument enables high-speed chemical imaging of tissuesEnhanced instrument enables high-speed chemical imaging of tissues

Lunar pits could shelter astronauts, reveal details of how 'man in the moon' formedLunar pits could shelter astronauts, reveal details of how 'man in the moon' formed

Scientists complete chromosome-based draft of the wheat genomeScientists complete chromosome-based draft of the wheat genome

Study led by indigenous people uncovers grizzly bear 'highway'Study led by indigenous people uncovers grizzly bear 'highway'

Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivityTiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity

A crystal wedding in the nanocosmosA crystal wedding in the nanocosmos

Has Antarctic sea ice expansion been overestimated?Has Antarctic sea ice expansion been overestimated?

Boosting the force of empty spaceBoosting the force of empty space

New research: When it hurts to think we were made for each otherNew research: When it hurts to think we were made for each other

Bacteria swim with whole body, not just propellersBacteria swim with whole body, not just propellers

Mixed genes mix up the migrations of hybrid birdsMixed genes mix up the migrations of hybrid birds

PIWI proteins and piRNAs regulate genes in the germline and beyondPIWI proteins and piRNAs regulate genes in the germline and beyond

The economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic groups is specified by flintThe economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic groups is specified by flint

Law of physics governs airplane evolutionLaw of physics governs airplane evolution

Wisconsin scientists find genetic recipe to turn stem cells to bloodWisconsin scientists find genetic recipe to turn stem cells to blood

Running for life: How speed restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral columnRunning for life: How speed restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral column

Brain waves show learning to read does not end in 4th grade, contrary to popular theory

The bend in the Appalachian mountain chain is finally explainedThe bend in the Appalachian mountain chain is finally explained

Cooperation among humans, a question of ageCooperation among humans, a question of age

Protein's 'hands' enable bacteria to establish infection, research findsProtein's 'hands' enable bacteria to establish infection, research finds

Less exercise, not more calories, responsible for expanding waistlinesLess exercise, not more calories, responsible for expanding waistlines

High earners in a stock market game have brain patterns that can predict market bubblesHigh earners in a stock market game have brain patterns that can predict market bubbles

Platonic solids generate their 4-dimensional analoguesPlatonic solids generate their 4-dimensional analogues

A healthy lifestyle adds years to lifeA healthy lifestyle adds years to life

Study of animal urination could lead to better-engineered productsStudy of animal urination could lead to better-engineered products

Do probiotics help kids with stomach bugs?Do probiotics help kids with stomach bugs?

Strict diet suspends development, doubles lifespan of wormsStrict diet suspends development, doubles lifespan of worms

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Ohio State implants first brain pacemaker to treat Alzheimer's (1/24/2013)

Tags:
brain implants
Kathy Sanford became the first Alzheimer's patient in the United States to have a pacemaker implanted in her brain. She is the first of up to 10 patients who will be enrolled in an FDA-approved study at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to determine if using a brain pacemaker can improve cognitive and behavioral functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease. -  Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Kathy Sanford became the first Alzheimer's patient in the United States to have a pacemaker implanted in her brain. She is the first of up to 10 patients who will be enrolled in an FDA-approved study at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to determine if using a brain pacemaker can improve cognitive and behavioral functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease. - Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

During a five-hour surgery last October at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Kathy Sanford became the first Alzheimer's patient in the United States to have a pacemaker implanted in her brain.

She is the first of up to 10 patients who will be enrolled in an FDA-approved study at Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center to determine if using a brain pacemaker can improve cognitive and behavioral functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

The study employs the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS), the same technology used to successfully treat about 100,000 patients worldwide with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In the study, researchers hope to determine whether DBS surgery can improve function governed by the frontal lobe and neural networks involved in cognition and behavior by stimulating certain areas of the brain with a pacemaker.

Dr. Douglas Scharre, neurologist and director of the division of cognitive neurology, and Dr. Ali Rezai, neurosurgeon and director of the neuroscience program, both at Wexner Medical Center, are conducting the study.

"If the early findings that we're seeing continue to be robust and progressive, then I think that will be very promising and encouraging for us," says Rezai, who also directs the Center for Neuromodulation at Ohio State. "But so far we are cautiously optimistic."

The deep brain stimulation implant is similar to a cardiac pacemaker device with the exception that the pacemaker wires are implanted in the brain rather than the heart.

"Basically, the pacemakers send tiny signals into the brain that regulate the abnormal activity of the brain and normalize it more," says Rezai. "Right now, from what we're seeing in our first patient, I think the results are encouraging, but this is research. We need to do more research and understand what's going on."

The study, which will enroll people with mild or early-stage Alzheimer's disease, will help determine if DBS has the potential to improve cognitive, behavioral and functional deficits.

Sanford continues to be evaluated to determine the effectiveness of the technology, says Rezai. She says she volunteered for the study to help others avoid the angst she has suffered as Alzheimer's slowly disrupted her life.

"I'm just trying to make the world a better place," says Sanford. "That's all I'm doing."

Her father, Joe Jester, says he is proud that his daughter is participating in the study, and is pleased to see her showing improvements.

"This study seemed to just give us hope," said Jester. "I guess we were at the place where you just don't do anything and watch the condition deteriorate over the years, or try to do something that would give us hope and might stop the progression of this disease."

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of degenerative dementia, afflicting about 5.5 million Americans and costing more than $100 billion per year, ranking it the third costliest disease in terms of health care expenditures in the United States.

Alzheimer's disease - which has no cure and is not easily managed - becomes progressively disabling with loss of memory, cognition, worsening behavioral function, in addition to a gradual loss of independent functioning, says Scharre.

The Ohio State neurology team is nationally renowned for expertise in dementia and Alzheimer's care and research. In addition, the neuromodulation team at Ohio State are pioneers in the use of DBS to treat Parkinson's disease, as well as exploring the use of DBS for other neurological and neurobehavioral conditions. Researchers at the Neuromodulation Center are completing a study of DBS in patients with traumatic brain injuries, and have initiated a study of DBS for treating obesity.

The Alzheimer's study is scheduled to be completed in 2015.
A woman in Ohio was the first in the United States to be implanted with a pacemaker in her brain to help with Alzheimer's disease. Doctors at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center will study her progress over the next two years. - Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the MediaSource

Post Comments:

Search
New Articles
Artificial intelligence identifies the musical progression of the Beatles

Using a deacetyl chitin conduit and short-term electrical stimulation for PNI

Getting a grip on robotic graspGetting a grip on robotic grasp

Squishy robots

Virtual finger enables scientists to navigate and analyze complex 3D images

Potential new therapy with brain-on-a-chip axonal strain injury modelPotential new therapy with brain-on-a-chip axonal strain injury model

DARPA selects Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memoryDARPA selects Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory

Collisions with robots -- without risk of injuryCollisions with robots -- without risk of injury

Muscle-powered bio-bots walk on commandMuscle-powered bio-bots walk on command

Ask the crowd: Robots learn faster, better with online helpersAsk the crowd: Robots learn faster, better with online helpers

Collaborative learning -- for robots

Bioelectronics could lead to a new class of medicine

World's first magnetic hose createdWorld's first magnetic hose created

3-D computer model may help refine target for deep brain stimulation therapy for dystonia

Wearable computing gloves can teach Braille, even if you're not paying attentionWearable computing gloves can teach Braille, even if you're not paying attention



Archives
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007


Science Friends
Agricultural Science
Astronomy News
Sports Medicine
Biology News
Biomimicry Science
Cognitive Research
Chemistry News
Tissue Engineering
Cancer Research
Electonics Research
Forensics Report
Fossil News
Genetic Archaeology
Genetics News
Geology News
Microbiology Research
Nanotech News
Parenting News
Physics News


  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2015 Web Doodle, LLC. All rights reserved.